Posts Tagged ‘New Orleans Criminal Attorney’

Fifteen-Year-Old Survivor of Houston Shooting Doing Well.

Posted by admin on July 13th, 2014

This is the heartbreaking story of a family of six shot in Houston by a deranged brother-in-law.  The lone survivor is a fifteen-year-old girl that says that her family is in a better place.  So sad.

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Daughter Sleeps Next to Mom’s Corpse for Three Years

Posted by admin on July 12th, 2014

In a New York City apartment a daughter with mental issues slept next to her mother’s dead, decomposing body for three years.  She also dressed up her body and placed her at the dinner table at meal time.

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New Jersey Teen Accused of Torching House Due in Court

Posted by admin on October 3rd, 2012

A New Jersey teenager charged with attempted murder and arson for allegedly setting a fire at her family’s house is due in court.

The 15-year-old faces a hearing in family court in Gloucester County on Monday. Her name is being withheld because she is a juvenile.

Authorities say the Saturday morning fire was set with gasoline. Most of the damage was contained to the second floor of the single-family house.

The teen and six other family members were injured, including two who were taken to a burn center in Pennsylvania with internal burns.

The suspect is being held at the Camden County Juvenile Detention Center.

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Kansas City Law firm owner indicted on first degree murder charges

Posted by admin on October 3rd, 2012

The owner of a Kansas City law firm was indicted Friday on first-degree murder and forgery charges, but authorities would not confirm whether it’s related to the 2010 shooting death of the attorney’s father.

The Jackson County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release that Susan Elizabeth Van Note, 44, of the Kansas City suburb Lee’s Summit, was arrested shortly after the indictment and that the charges are in connection to an investigation into a 2010 homicide in Camden County. The release does not name the homicide victim.

Van Note’s father, 67-year-old accountant William Van Note, was shot in October 2010 along with his companion, Sharon Dickson, 59. Dickson died in the shooting at their Sunrise Beach home at the Lake of the Ozarks in Camden County. Van Note died four days later in a hospital in Boone County.

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George Zimmerman’s Bond revoked

Posted by admin on June 2nd, 2012

A Florida judge on Friday afternoon revoked bond for George Zimmerman, the man charged with second-degree murder in the death of Trayvon Martin, and ordered that he turn himself in within 48 hours.
Prosecutors had asked Seminole County Circuit Judge Kenneth Lester Jr. to revoke Zimmerman’s bond because they contend that he was disingenuous at an earlier bond hearing when Zimmerman’s family and attorney claimed that he was cash broke. The motion filed by prosecutors claims that Zimmerman “misrepresented, mislead [sic] and deceived the court.”
During a bond hearing on April 20, Lester set Zimmerman’s bond at $150,000, and days later Zimmerman walked free. It was later revealed that Zimmerman had received upward of $200,000 from supporters, a sum that he did not reveal to the judge or to his own attorneys.
At that April hearing, defense attorney Mark O’Mara questioned Shelly Zimmerman, George Zimmerman’s wife, who said she had no idea how much was in the account.
Prosecutors claimed that Zimmerman and his wife knowingly colluded to hide those funds, collected through a Paypal account attached to a website that Zimmerman launched to raise funds for his defense and thank his supporters.
“This court was led to believe they didn’t have a single penny,” Prosecutor Bernie De la Rionda said at Friday’s hearing. “It was misleading, and I don’t know what words to use other than it was a blatant lie.”
According to the conditions of Zimmerman’s release, he was to be monitored by GPS and surrender his passport.
During Friday’s motion hearing, prosecutors said that Zimmerman also failed to disclose or turn over a second passport in his possession. According to the motion, Zimmerman acquired a second passport in 2004 after filing a claim with the State Department that his original passport was lost or stolen.
But, according to prosecutors, while Zimmerman was in custody at the Seminole County jail on April 17, he had a conversation with his wife in which the couple discussed the second passport. The conversation was recorded by jail officials:
Defendant: Do you know what? I think my passport is in that bag.
Shelly Zimmerman: I have one for you in safety deposit box…
Defendant: Ok, you hold on to that.
“It really is important what the judge did, because this whole case — the crux of this case — is about George Zimmerman’s credibility,” Benjamin Crump, an attorney for Martin’s family, told The Huffington Post not long after the judge’s ruling. “The court found that Zimmerman was dishonest, that he lied in court.”
Zimmerman, who was arrested 44 days after the Feb. 26 shooting in Sanford, Florida, has pleaded not guilty to the charges.
At Friday’s hearing, prosecutors asked that a list of witnesses’ names and other evidence, which per Florida law would be part of the public record, not be released; defense attorney O’Mara also asked that the records be kept sealed. But a number of news organizations — including national news outlets such as the Associated Press, The New York Times, CNN and CBS News, as well as local agencies like the Orlando Sentinel — have filed a legal motion to ask that the judge allow all such documents to be made public.
The evidence, according to the Sentinel, includes five statements that Zimmerman gave authorities, crime scene photos that show Martin’s body and cellphone records for both men.
De La Rionda said that to make those records public could jeopardize the state’s case against Zimmerman.
“What’s occurring, unfortunately, are cases are being tried in the public sector as opposed to in the courtroom,” De La Rionda told Lester. “We are in a new age with Twitter, Facebook and all these things I’ve never heard of before in my career. Everybody gets to find out intimate details about witnesses. That never occurred before. Witnesses are going to be reluctant to get involved.”

A Florida judge on Friday afternoon revoked bond for George Zimmerman, the man charged with second-degree murder in the death of Trayvon Martin, and ordered that he turn himself in within 48 hours.
Prosecutors had asked Seminole County Circuit Judge Kenneth Lester Jr. to revoke Zimmerman’s bond because they contend that he was disingenuous at an earlier bond hearing when Zimmerman’s family and attorney claimed that he was cash broke. The motion filed by prosecutors claims that Zimmerman “misrepresented, mislead [sic] and deceived the court.”
During a bond hearing on April 20, Lester set Zimmerman’s bond at $150,000, and days later Zimmerman walked free. It was later revealed that Zimmerman had received upward of $200,000 from supporters, a sum that he did not reveal to the judge or to his own attorneys.
At that April hearing, defense attorney Mark O’Mara questioned Shelly Zimmerman, George Zimmerman’s wife, who said she had no idea how much was in the account.
Prosecutors claimed that Zimmerman and his wife knowingly colluded to hide those funds, collected through a Paypal account attached to a website that Zimmerman launched to raise funds for his defense and thank his supporters.
“This court was led to believe they didn’t have a single penny,” Prosecutor Bernie De la Rionda said at Friday’s hearing. “It was misleading, and I don’t know what words to use other than it was a blatant lie.”
According to the conditions of Zimmerman’s release, he was to be monitored by GPS and surrender his passport.

During Friday’s motion hearing, prosecutors said that Zimmerman also failed to disclose or turn over a second passport in his possession. According to the motion, Zimmerman acquired a second passport in 2004 after filing a claim with the State Department that his original passport was lost or stolen.
But, according to prosecutors, while Zimmerman was in custody at the Seminole County jail on April 17, he had a conversation with his wife in which the couple discussed the second passport. The conversation was recorded by jail officials:
Defendant: Do you know what? I think my passport is in that bag.Shelly Zimmerman: I have one for you in safety deposit box…
Defendant: Ok, you hold on to that.
“It really is important what the judge did, because this whole case — the crux of this case — is about George Zimmerman’s credibility,” Benjamin Crump, an attorney for Martin’s family, told The Huffington Post not long after the judge’s ruling. “The court found that Zimmerman was dishonest, that he lied in court.”
Zimmerman, who was arrested 44 days after the Feb. 26 shooting in Sanford, Florida, has pleaded not guilty to the charges.
At Friday’s hearing, prosecutors asked that a list of witnesses’ names and other evidence, which per Florida law would be part of the public record, not be released; defense attorney O’Mara also asked that the records be kept sealed. But a number of news organizations — including national news outlets such as the Associated Press, The New York Times, CNN and CBS News, as well as local agencies like the Orlando Sentinel — have filed a legal motion to ask that the judge allow all such documents to be made public.
The evidence, according to the Sentinel, includes five statements that Zimmerman gave authorities, crime scene photos that show Martin’s body and cellphone records for both men.
De La Rionda said that to make those records public could jeopardize the state’s case against Zimmerman.
“What’s occurring, unfortunately, are cases are being tried in the public sector as opposed to in the courtroom,” De La Rionda told Lester. “We are in a new age with Twitter, Facebook and all these things I’ve never heard of before in my career. Everybody gets to find out intimate details about witnesses. That never occurred before. Witnesses are going to be reluctant to get involved.”

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Summary of 2012 Proposed Amendments to the Sentencing Guidelines

Posted by admin on May 31st, 2012

Summary of 2012 Proposed Amendment to the Sentencing Guidelines

Sentencing Resource Counsel Project

Commission, the Commission created a new Chapter Three adjustment, §3A1.5, adding enhancements from 2-4 levels, and setting a floor of level 37 for most serious human rights offenses. The Commission also added new enhancements for immigration and naturalization fraud offenses sentenced under §2L2.2. Under the new amendments, if the defendant committed the charged fraud “to conceal” participation in a human rights offense, the offense level is increased by 6-10 levels, depending on the offense, and has a floor of level 25. In addition, a 2- level increase and floor of level 13 applies if the defendant committed the fraud “to conceal the defendant’s membership in, or authority over, a military, paramilitary, or police organization that was involved in a serious human rights offense.”

  1. Driving While Intoxicated always counts for criminal history: The Commission amended Application Note 5 in §4A1.2 to make clear that contrary to the interpretation by the 2nd circuit, and consistent with the interpretation of the 7th and 8th circuits, a defendant’s prior sentence for driving while intoxicated or under the influence is always counted toward the defendant’s criminal history score, regardless of how it is classified (felony, misdemeanor or petty offense).
  2. Cell phones in prison: The Cell Phone Contraband Act, which amended 18 U.S.C. §1791, made it a class A misdemeanor to provide a mobile phone to an inmate, or for an inmate to possess one. The Commission amended §2P1.2 to assign mobile phones and similar devices a base offense level of 6. (This is much better than the other option the Commission was considering which would have set a BOL of 13 for this offense, thereby equating a cell phone with a weapon.)

10.  Prevent AH Cigarette Trafficking Act (PACT): The PACT Act imposes strict restrictions on the ‘delivery sale’ of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. The Commission amended Appendix A to reference violations of the act under 15 U.S.C. § 377 to §2T2.1 (Non- Payment of Taxes) and §2T2.2 (Regulatory Offenses), and amended commentary in both of those provisions to indicate that §2T2.1 applies if the conduct constitutes nonpayment, evasion, or attempted evasion of taxes, and §2T2.2 applies if the conduct is tantamount to a record-keeping violation rather than an effort to evade payment of taxes. The PACT Act also created a new Class A misdemeanor at 18 U.S.C. § 1716E for shipping cigarettes through the mail. The Commission amended Appendix A to reference those violations to §2T2.2.

11.  Animal Crush Videos: The Commission amended Appendix A to reference the crime of creating or distributing an animal crush video under 18 U.S.C § 48 to §2G3.1 (Importing, Mailing, or Transporting Obscene Matter; Transferring Obscene Matter to a Minor; Misleading Domain Names).

  1. Indian Arts and Crafts: The Commission amended Appendix A to reference offenses under 18 U.S.C. § 1159 (Misrepresentation of Indian produced goods and services) to §2B1.1. The Commission also amended Appendix A to reference offenses under 18 U.S.C. § 1158 (Counterfeiting Indian Arts and Crafts Board trade mark) to both §2B1.1 and §2B5.3 (Criminal Infringement of Copyright or Trademark).

Notably Absent from the Amendment List

Despite publishing several options for “burglary of a non-dwelling” and “categorical approach to priors,” the Commission made no changes. The Commission made clear, however, that these issues are on the front burner for next year. In light of this, if anyone has any specific issues in these two areas you would like to bring to SRC’s attention, we encourage you to do so.

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